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Dog Bite Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

dog bite faq

  1. What constitutes a dog bite?
  2. Can I sue for injuries caused by a dog bite?
  3. What damages can I claim in dog bite case?
  4. What information should I capture following a dog bite?
  5. What if I was petting the dog prior to an attack?
  6. Is the dog owner covered by insurance?
  7. If my friend’s dog bit me should I file a claim?
  8. If I was bitten while working, am I eligible for workers’ compensation?
  9. How long does a dog bite lawsuit take?
  10. How does a lawyer help in a dog bite case?
  11. How much does a dog bite lawsuit cost?

Q: What constitutes a dog bite?
A: A dog bite occurs when a dog’s mouth is closed around a part of the body. A person’s skin does not need to be broken to constitute a dog bite. It can also cause a crush injury to an individual. Often there is emotional trauma that occurs during an animal attack, in addition to physical damage.

Q: Can I sue for injuries caused by a dog bite?
A: If you’ve been injured in a dog bite attack you can bring a claim or lawsuit against the dog’s owner or the person in control of the dog at the time of the incident. If your child was injured you can bring a claim on behalf of your child.

Q: What damages can I claim in dog bite case?
A: Animal attacks can cause both physical and emotional injury. The types of damages you can claim include medical bills (both current and future), pain and suffering, emotional distress, loss of earning capacity, disfigurement and loss of wages due to the injury, among others.

Q: What information should I capture following a dog bite?
A: After a dog bite incident, you should get the name, address and contact information of the owner of the animal, the location of the attack, and any other relevant information about the incident. You should also take pictures of the scene and your injuries if possible.

Q: What if I was petting the dog prior to an attack?
A: As long as you were not provoking or antagonizing the animal prior to an attack, you can still pursue compensation. Some forms of provocation include hitting the dog, pulling its tail or even yelling at the dog.

Q: If my friend’s dog bit me should I file a claim?
A: If you have been injured by a dog in your friend’s house or property, you may consider filing a claim. Generally speaking, homeowners insurance covers attacks by animals.

Q: If I was bitten while working, am I eligible for workers’ compensation?
A: If you were bitten while performing your job, you may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits. Additionally, you may be able to seek compensation for damages from the owner and/or handler of the animal.

Q: How long does a dog bite lawsuit take?
A: There are a number factors that affect the length of a lawsuit, including the extent of the injuries, the number of parties, the complexity of the claim, etc. The facts of every case are different, thus there is no one-size-fits-all answer here. If you’ve sustained injuries from a dog bite, you should seek advice from a lawyer to help understand your rights and options.

Q: How does a lawyer help in a dog bite case?
A: An injury lawyer can assist with the claim process, from the time of the free initial consultation to an investigation of the claim, and beyond. And if a trial was necessitated, an experienced New Jersey dog bite lawyer could prepare your case and try it before a jury.

Q: How much does a dog bite lawsuit cost?
A: We handle these cases on a contingency basis. This means there is no cost to you regardless of the outcome of the claim. If we obtain a financial recovery, we are paid a predetermined percentage of the recovery, as allowed by law. This protects our client, as there are no “up front” costs associated with their claim.